Stair Anatomy Part 2

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Stair Anatomy Part 2

Stair Anatomy Part 1 discussed the two basic styles of stairway structure: post-to-post and over-the-post. The post-to-post style pairs well with traditional, rustic or European influenced homes, where the handrail sits on top of the newel, and a decorative top piece sits on the surface of the handrail. Over-the-post is the opposite of post-to-post where there is no decorative top piece, and the handrails sit directly on top of the newels and balusters throughout the whole staircase. Many over-the-post styles have a modern, contemporary feel, but can be transformed into traditional styles by adding detailed balusters. Stair Anatomy Part 2 displays a graphic of the important stair parts and their definitions.

  • Baluster – vertical spindles that are housed between the tread and railing.
  • Handrail – a rail fixed to posts or a wall for people to hold on to for support.
  • Newel – a post that holds the railing to the correct height.
  • Over-the-post system – the handrails sit directly on top of the newels and balusters throughout the whole staircase.
  • Post-to-post system – the handrail sits on top of the newel, and a decorative top piece sits on the surface of the handrail.
  • Riser – a vertical section between the treads of a staircase.
  • Tread – the top surface of a step or stair.
November 12th, 2015|